Making The Case To Legislate Against Porn

By: Tia Johnson 0 Comments   11/22/2013

I’m not that old, but I remember the days when pornography was purchased in “special” stores. I also remember a day when my dad caught an undesired glimpse of pornography on display in a regular department store. Back then, it wasn’t too prevalent, and let’s just say that thereafter, our family didn’t frequent that department store unless we had to.

I remember the day when pornography had to be sought by its consumer. Now, the table has tipped the other way: pornography seeks the consumer: uninvited, unannounced—it just shows up.

It "showed up" on a computer in my high school library. That was near the year 2000, when some techno-smart boys thought it’d be funny to send obscene images to other computers in the library. Also back them, an invitation to porn invaded instant message conversations to friends. This happened more than once. You could call it a virus sent by sick minds.

Speed ahead to my college Art History class in 2005, where our professor offered a porn video as part of one class session. She offered optional attendance, but strongly encouraged everyone to come—specifically myself. Apparently, she thought my clean mind needed some dirtying up. At first mention I thought I’d skip it. But when my professor encouraged me to attend, well, I did consider it briefly. Should I be more “open-minded” and take this in as a form of art? Then I thought of my impending marriage. Would I be able to erase those images from my mind? Absolutely not, and I would not harm my future marriage at the urging of my professor.

These incidences do not compare to what I’ve seen more than a decade later, however. My 5-year-old daughter was playing princess games on the computer just a few months ago, and the advertisement to the side of her game was- you guessed it- pornography. It wasn't an invitation to porn- it was pornography- a scantily dressed woman figuratively asking for a click of the mouse. And this wasn’t a virus- this was a welcomed, fixed advertisement on a page of free princess games for children.

How’s a parent to respond? How does one parent in a world where one has to actively turn from evil lest it turn on you? Pornography is no longer contained in a store—it’s unleashed into innocent homes. And when I look upon our quaint west-central Minnesota towns on a quiet summer’s night, I wonder: How many “really nice guys” -or gals for that matter- are indulging in pornography in the security of their own homes?

Ariel Castro may have been considered one of those “nice guys” before he abducted three women and abused them in his basement for 10 years. His demeanor was very much that of a “good neighbor.” Yet hear his words in court: “I believe I am addicted to porn to the point that it really makes me impulsive…” He insisted that he was not making excuses for his actions, but described himself as sick because of his addiction to porn. He said his addiction became so severe that he practiced pornography and masturbation 2-3 hours nonstop. He described his actions as not pre-meditated, but impulsive. They were impulsive reactions built upon a sin-scorched heart.

I would gander to guess that every rapist and pedophile started out with pornography. They likely were exposed at a young age, and at that time probably never thought they would act on it physically. Yet there comes a point when the pornography is not enough.

Perhaps that’s why Britain is moving to block unsolicited porn from the internet. In other words, beginning next year, porn will only be accessible to users who specifically ask for access to it online—sort of like actively going to the store to get it. Prime Minister David Cameron also plans to make it a crime to “possess pornography depicting rape,” according to John Stonestreet of Breakpoint.org. Cameron told the British Press that this is “about how we protect our children and their innocence.”

Pornography is not victimless

Breakpoint also had said that Iceland was looking at a similar protective measure. As they had reported, these governments are recognizing that pornography is not victimless. It destroys the mind of those who engage in it (as Ariel Castro had admitted to in his court speech), but it also destroys families, leaves innocent women and children vulnerable to violence, and destroys those actors who perform it (see Delight Media article on a former porn producer who became a pastor).

So, should governments be involved in limiting pornography? That depends upon how you view the role of government. Some would say that freedom of speech prevails here. Really? It prevails though it precedes violence? I’d say not. If the primary purpose of government is to protect its people, then government should be involved in the dissemination of pornography. Certainly action needs to take place when porn is aggressively pursuing the minds of 5-year-old little girls playing princess games!

The horrid prevalence of porn and the dangerous road it leads to scares me as a mom. Dare I trust my kids on the streets of our small nearby towns without knowing what’s on the screens in the homes aligning the sidewalk? Then I remember: though I can’t see those screens, God can. And though I can’t be everywhere with my kids, God can. He sees all. There’s great comfort in that, and there’s also great conviction in that.

DelightMedia.com


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