New Film 'Courageous' Highlights Importance of Fathers and the Results Without Them

By: Tia Johnson 0 Comments   8/3/2011

The creators of Fireproof have sweated out another film. Courageous will hit theatres September 30 and is expected to appear at the Parkwood 18 Theatre in Waite Park.

While mainstream entertainment tends to knock down dads, this movie is set to challenge dads to a higher standard, as illustrated in the following scene:

"You've been a good enough father," said one dad to another dad. His response: "I don't want to be a 'good enough' father."

Also in the movie the same dad laments, "I want to know... what God expects of me?"

Those scenes captures what this movie is about. Viewers are introduced to four fathers who are law enforcement officers. While these officers pour their all into fighting crime on the job (with lots of drama and action, I might add), they struggle to engage with their children when at home.

Alex Kendrick co-wrote this film with his brother, Stephen Kendrick. The Kendricks have also had part in the previous three films put out by Sherwood Pictures: Fireproof, Facing the Giants, and Flywheel.

They are hoping this film will have definite impact on fathers in our culture.

"It's our hope that men watch this film, see a little bit of themselves on the screen, and say that's the kind of dad I am, but (this is) the kind of man I need to be," said Alex Kendrick.

The storyline's irony is that much of the crime these officers battle is linked to criminals who were raised in fatherless homes, which gives these officers even more reason to take seriously their role of fathering.

"The kids typically who have no fathers are the ones who end up being in gangs," said Jim Salo, executive director of American Police Chaplains Association. "The gang members want to recruit young people and they will tell them in no uncertain terms 'you're family.'"

According to fathersunite.org [http://www.fathersunite.org/statistics_on_fatherlessnes.html], 85 percent of imprisoned youths are from fatherless homes. Children without a father present also fall prey to homelessness and running away (90 percent), suicide (63 percent), and dropping out of high school (71 percent).

"We are feeling with the crying that's going on in our nation," said Stephen Kendrick. "With a generation rising up, not understanding their identity, we're constantly feeling the vacuum that has come from fathers not being engaged in the life of their kids."

Most Important Job Is At Home

A turning point seems to be made when these fathers realize that the most important job they have is at home- not on the streets. The fathers struggle to fight for their families, especially their children, who may be on the verge of becoming a statistic.

On the movie's website, http://www.courageousthemovie.com/themovie, former NFL coach Tony Dungy addresses the question many fathers struggle with: So, then, what makes a really good dad?

He says many dads believe providing a house or car suffices being a "good dad." But what a father takes home in pay is actually irrelevant. "The biggest part of being a great dad is just to love your kids," he says.

And to instruct them in Biblical truth, as stated in Genesis 18 when God spoke to one of the most famous fathers in the world, Abraham: "For I have known him, in order that he may command his children and his household after him, that they keep the way of the Lord, to do righteousness and justice, that the Lord may bring to Abraham what He has spoken to him." (NKJV)

Resources abound beyond just the movie to help dads demonstrate love and teach Biblical truth to their kids. On www.courageousresources.com, ideas are offered to act on the principles of real fatherhood. Bulletin inserts and flyers are available to print off. Also, Bible study resources, short articles on fatherhood, and ideas on how to engage with your kids are available for download.

"This movie will set up churches to begin doing these grassroots accountability groups for men," said Alex Kendrick. "We're gonna model it in this movie-- I'm talking about with a cause, a standard, and a level of accountability that calls these men to say 'as for me and my house, we want to serve the Lord.'"

Such resources, if used properly, could have incredible spiritual impact in the home. According to a survey done in Switzerland in 1994 [http://www.fisheaters.com/menandchurch2.html], if a mother attended church regularly and the father did not, only 2 percent of the children will grow up to become regular attendees (possibly 37 percent will attend church irregularly). On the other hand, if the father attended church regularly and the mother did not, close to 40 percent of children will grow up to become regular attendees!

Such information begs the same question the movie poses: "So, where are you, Men of Courage?"

Hopefully they will be in theaters September 30.

"Our hope is that this movie will result in kids in the next generation growing up knowing the love of their earthly father, and in so doing, discovering about the love of their heavenly father," said Stephen Kendrick.

Here is the movie trailer;

Here is another video.

DelightMedia.com


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